Walk This Number of Steps to Live Longer

Ever heard someone tell you they walked their 10,000 steps today?

Well, that’s great but according to the latest science, it’s probably more than they needed to live longer.

It turns out that the “10,000 steps-a-day” rule came from a decades-old marketing campaign for a Japanese pedometer. And there was no science to back it up.

Fast forward to 2022, and researchers believe they now have the answer. The “Steps for Health Collaborative” undertook a meta-analysis of 15 studies involving over 50,000 people across four continents. The results offered fresh insight into the number of daily steps needed to improve your health and longevity.

It turns out that for adults 60 and older, the risk of premature death leveled off at about 6,000-8,000 steps per day. In other words, steps beyond that provided no additional benefit for longevity.  Adults younger than 60 saw the risk of premature death stabilize at about 8,000-10,000 steps per day.

To learn more, check out this summary from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.  Or click below to see more longevity tips.

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All information and recommendations on this site are for information only and are not intended as formal medical advice from your physician or other health care professionals. This information is also not intended as a substitute for information contained on any product label or packaging. Diagnosis and treatment of any health issues, use of any prescription medications, and any forms of medical treatments should not be altered by any information on this site without confirmation by your medical team. Any diet, exercise, or supplement program could have dangerous side effects if you have certain medical conditions; consult with your healthcare providers before making any change to your longevity lifestyle if you suspect you have a health problem. Do not stop taking any medication without consulting with the prescribing doctor.